51 CARRINGTON ROAD, BOX HILL

comments

AUGUST 2012

Click on images to enlarge

If bums on seats is any indication, this would have to be the most popular Vietnamese restaurant on the strip. Food great, service nifty and open seven days a week!

The Flavour of Vietnam

At first glance a plate of Vietnamese food might look a lot like Chinese food, but that impression will disappear after the first taste.  In fact, the essence of Vietnamese cuisine may be best understood in contrast to Chinese food.  Politically Vietnam spent centuries resisting the dominance of Chinese culture, and that resistance finds full expression in Vietnamese food.

Where the Chinese love to use generous portions of peanut and sesame oil, the Vietnamese go to incredible lengths to avoid using any oil whatsoever.  Where the Chinese love to stir-fry and deep-fry, the Vietnamese prefer to simmer, steam or eat food raw.

Virtually everything about Vietnamese food is light and delicate, with lemongrass, shallots, scallions, mint, coriander, and the subtle nuoc mam sauce taking the place of Chinese bean pastes, ginger, sugar, vinegar, cornstarch and soy sauce.

While rarely appearing at a Chinese table, fresh, uncooked vegetables and salads are an integral part of most Vietnamese meals.  Even the Vietnamese pancakes, used to roll up spiced meats, shredded vegetables, and fruits for dipping, are different.  They are made of rice flour and pounded so thinly you can read the newspaper through them.

As the French, who took a brief turn learning about the indomitable Vietnamese spirit, say, Vietnamese cooking is the nouvelle cuisine of Asia.
This information from their website www.indochinerestaurant.com.au and is also displayed on the restaurant window.

The Flavour of Vietnam


At first glance a plate of Vietnamese food might look a lot like Chinese food, but that impression will disappear after the first taste.  In fact, the essence of Vietnamese cuisine may be best understood in contrast to Chinese food.  Politically Vietnam spent centuries resisting the dominance of Chinese culture, and that resistance finds full expression in Vietnamese food.

Where the Chinese love to use generous portions of peanut and sesame oil, the Vietnamese go to incredible lengths to avoid using any oil whatsoever.  Where the Chinese love to stir-fry and deep-fry, the Vietnamese prefer to simmer, steam or eat food raw.

Virtually everything about Vietnamese food is light and delicate, with lemongrass, shallots, scallions, mint, coriander, and the subtle nuoc mam sauce taking the place of Chinese bean pastes, ginger, sugar, vinegar, cornstarch and soy sauce.

While rarely appearing at a Chinese table, fresh, uncooked vegetables and salads are an integral part of most Vietnamese meals.  Even the Vietnamese pancakes, used to roll up spiced meats, shredded vegetables, and fruits for dipping, are different.  They are made of rice flour and pounded so thinly you can read the newspaper through them.

As the French, who took a brief turn learning about the indomitable Vietnamese spirit, say, Vietnamese cooking is the nouvelle cuisine of Asia.

This information from their website www.indochinerestaurant.com.au and is also displayed on the restaurant window.

Pork & prawn rice paper rolls

Hanoi traditional spring rolls - pork, shrimps, vegetables & mushrooms in chewy rice paper, fried to a crisp golden brown, served with aromatic herbs & a dipping sauce

Bánh cuốn - steamed crêpes filled with pork & mushrooms, garnished with Vietnamese pork sausage (cha lua) and crisp fried shallots

Bánh xèo - A thin tumeric-fragrant crispy crêpe filled with bean shoots, mung beans, ground pork, mushrooms & prawns